Skyscraper fun with OR-Tools!

My friend Mike recently showed me a puzzle game called Skyscrapers, which you can play here. It’s a neat idea, in the general theme of “fill in the numbers with these constraints” puzzles like Sudoku or Verbal Arithmetic.

The rules are like so. You’re given a board like this, representing a group of city blocks (one building per square), with numbers around the sides: read more

The Knapsack Problem: Discrete Optimization, week 2

I’ve been doing this Coursera Discrete Optimization course with my friends. It’s a lot of fun and I’m learning a bunch. The instructor is a total goofball too, which is a plus. I’ve taken a handful of online courses before, but to be honest, the assignments have usually been pretty easy. Not so with this Discrete Optimization (DO (my initials!)) course! Each week, you have to solve 6 problems, and each is graded out of 10 depending on how well you do. I believe the breakdown is: 0/10 if your answer doesn’t even match the output format required, 3/10 if you do basically anything (even if your answer is quite wrong), 7/10 if you have an answer above some threshold but still not perfect, and 10/10 if your answer is optimal (I guess they know the optimal solution for all of them?). Usually, the problems increase in hardness throughout the set; often, the last one is difficult enough that (I believe we saw this said in the course forums by the instructor) it would be a challenge for people who specialize in DO for a living. I think that’s pretty cool! They usually give you a ton of practice problems of various difficulties, and (though I’m not 100% sure) I think the 6 you’re graded on are usually among those.

So what is DO? I certainly didn’t know when I started this course, though I guess I should’ve been able to guess. Optimization is what it sounds like, finding the best solution you can for given problems. The “discrete” part is that the quantities involved are integers or discrete (that’s the name in the title!!!) components. It turns out I had actually heard of many of the problems that DO applies to before, but didn’t know they were DO. I had heard most of them in the context of P vs NP complexity. read more