Programmatically recreating Sol LeWitt’s “All two-part combinations of arcs from corners and sides, and straight, not straight and broken lines” with d3.js

Skip to the full page interactive version if you don’t want to read the post!

I recently went to MASS MoCA with my friends for the first time. I had heard of it, but assumed they were talking about a huge chocolate flavored coffee drink. So imagine my surprise! read more

Some mathy tesselating stamp art!

I was recently at the art store for some reason, just browsing. I found the linoleum stamp section at the back and immediately wanted to make some! We had made them in 5th grade art class or something, and I remember liking it a lot, but had never since then. They’re kind of the perfect type of art for me, since I seem to like 3D things with more of a “crafts” element. I like carving/whittling anyway, so this was perfect.

I grabbed a few (pretty cheap), and on the way home thought of what I’d do: make a square stamp with weaving paths, asymmetric, such that it could be stamped out in a grid to either create cool repeating patterns, or random ones. read more

Neato sequence art

A while ago I watched this video by Numberphile (a very cool channel!). In terms of the actual math, it’s pretty light, but what I love about it is the idea of creating very cool images via very simple rules.

The idea of it is this. In the video, the guy shows a way of drawing a sequence of numbers (more on that in a minute). You draw a number line, and then you draw a semicircle above the line from the first number of the sequence to the second, with a diameter equal to the distance between the points. Then, you draw a semicircle from the second to third numbers of the sequence in the same way, except this time, the semicircle goes under the number line. You continue this way as long as you want, alternating above/below for the semicircles. read more

Beef tallow fancy fries, or: Malcolm Gladwell broke my heart

Sike, I’m fine. I’m just making fun of Malcolm Gladwell’s clickbait-y style, and in this case, the actual title of one of his sensationalist podcasts, here. To make an unnecessarily long story shorter, in one Revisionist History podcast, Malcolm Gladwell realized that McDonald’s fries aren’t as good now as they were when he was a kid. He went on a quest to figure out why, and apparently it’s cause they used to use beef tallow to fry their fries in, and then the trans-fat scare in the 90s made them have to change to vegetable oil. He talks to some food scientists who explain why they don’t make as good fries (something about the oil permeating the potato?), and eventually makes some with a food scientist at their place.

He then waxes on about how they’re heaven on earth, things aren’t what they used to be, blah blah blah. read more

Measuring the spinner

This is silly and derpy, but here we are. Read on if you’re having trouble getting to sleep.

Often for research, we need to make a thin film of photoresist, so we can do photolithography or e-beam lithography. Photolithography is cool (technical term) because you can pretty easily (seriously: with a UV flashlight and a home printer; I’ll probably write that up at some point) pattern the film over a wide area. It’s straightforward and easy enough that machines can do it. However, its resolution is relatively limited, down to about 1 micron (human hair thickness: 25-100 micron). I should be careful saying this because you can get better resolution through various methods (like using a smaller wavelength of light), and for industrial applications they can do a lot smaller. However, for research purposes, ~1-10 micron is usually the figure people say (and this depends on definition too; do you mean the smallest linewidth, distance between lines, or precision for a given spot?). read more