Descending into modular neuroevolution for logic circuits

A while ago, I did a post on beating OpenAI games using neuroevolution (NE). Go read that if you’re interested, but here’s the gist: a typical strategy for training an agent to beat those games is to have a neural network (NN) play the games a bunch, and then improve the weights of the NN using a reinforcement learning algorithm that uses gradient descent (GD), and it of course works pretty well.

However, an alternative to those methods is to use a gradient free method (which I’ll call “GD-free”), like I did in that post: you try a bunch of random changes to the NN’s weights, and only keep the resulting NNs that play the game well. That’s the “evolutionary” aspect of it, and using methods like that to create NNs is often called “neuroevolution” (NE). read more

Beating OpenAI games with neuroevolution agents: pretty NEAT!

Let’s start with a fun gif!

Something I’ve been thinking about recently is neuroevolution (NE). NE is changing aspects of a neural network (NN) using principles from evolutionary algorithms (EA), in which you try to find the best NN for a given problem by trying different solutions (“individuals”) and changing them slightly (and sometimes combining them), and taking the ones that have better scores. read more

Solving the Brachistochrone and a cool parallel between diversity in genetic algorithms and simulated annealing

In my first post on Genetic Algorithms (GA), I mentioned at the end that I wanted to try doing some other applications of them, rather than just the N Queens Problem. In the next post, I built the “generic” GA algorithm structure, so it should be easy to test with other “species”, but didn’t end up using it for any applications.

I thought I’d do a bunch of applications, but the first one actually ended up being pretty interesting, so… here we are. read more