Descending into modular neuroevolution for logic circuits

A while ago, I did a post on beating OpenAI games using neuroevolution (NE). Go read that if you’re interested, but here’s the gist: a typical strategy for training an agent to beat those games is to have a neural network (NN) play the games a bunch, and then improve the weights of the NN using a reinforcement learning algorithm that uses gradient descent (GD), and it of course works pretty well.

However, an alternative to those methods is to use a gradient free method (which I’ll call “GD-free”), like I did in that post: you try a bunch of random changes to the NN’s weights, and only keep the resulting NNs that play the game well. That’s the “evolutionary” aspect of it, and using methods like that to create NNs is often called “neuroevolution” (NE). read more

Training a real robot to play Puckworld with reinforcement learning

After I trained an agent to play “puckworld” using Q-learning, I thought “hey, maybe I should make a real robot that learns this. It can’t be that hard, right?”

Hooooooooo boy. I did not appreciate how much harder problems in the physical world can be. Examples of amateurs doing Reinforcement Learning (RL) projects are all over the place on the internet, and robotics are certainly touted as one of the main applications for RL, but in my experience, I’ve only found a few examples of someone actually using RL to train a robot. Here’s a (very abridged!) overview of my adventure getting a robot to learn to play a game called puckworld. read more

Genetic Algorithms, part 2

Last time, in case you missed it, I left off with a laundry list of things I wanted to expand on with Genetic Algorithms (GA). Let’s see which of those I can do this time!

This is pretty wordy and kind of dry, since I was just messing around and figuring stuff out, but I promise the next one will have some cool visuals.